Sunday, September 9, 2012

Class 9 - English (Comm.) - Unit 6 - The Brook

The Brook
MCQs from CBSE Papers

Poet: Alfred Lord Tennyson

Q1(CBSE2011): Read the extract and answer the following questions by choosing the most appropriate options.

I steal by lawns and grassy plots,
I slide by hazel covers
I move the sweet forget—me—nots
That grow for happy lovers.






(1) I "steal" means __________. 


(a) by this time the brook‘s flow is silent.
(b) the brook steals its flow.
(c) the stealing nature is revealed by the brook.
(d) the brook explains its nature.

Lord Tennyson
(credits:wikipedia)
(2) 'forget—me—nots' are : 

(a) flowers.
(b) leaves.
(c) bushes.
(d) orchids.

(3) According to the poet, lovers generally like : 

(a) rose flowers.
(b) any kind of flower.
(c) marigold flowers.
(d) forget—me—nots.


Answers:
1: (a) by this time the brook‘s flow is silent.
2: (a) flowers.
3: (d) forget—me—nots.


Q2(CBSE 2010): Read the following extracts and choose the correct option :

I chatter, chatter, as I flow
To join the brimming river
For men may come and men may go
But I go on forever.

(1) The brook chatters by __________ .
(a) making sounds like a monkey
(b) jumping like a monkey
(c) keeping up with the monkey's pace
(d) making a loud noise as it rushes over different surfaces

(2) The final destination of the brook is _____ .
(a) Philip's farm
(b) the brimming river
(c) a sea
(d) Brambly wilderness

(3) The last two lines of this stanza are repeated several times in the poem. The reason for this
repetition is to show the __________ .


(a) perennial nature of the brook in contrast to the mortal existence of man
(b) mortal nature of the brook
(c) perennial nature of the brook
(d) immortal existence of man

Answers:
1: (d) making a loud noise as it rushes over different surfaces
2: (b) the brimming river
3: (a) perennial nature of the brook in contrast to the mortal existence of man


Q3(CBSE 2011): Read the extract and answer the following questions by choosing the most appropriate options.

By thirty hills I hurry down
Or slip between the ridges
By twenty thorpes, a little town
And half a hundred bridges

(1) The movement of the brook is ______________.

(a) slow
(b) steady
(c) swift
(d) gradual

(2) What do the words "thirty hills" and "twenty thorpes" suggest ?

(a) vast expanse of brook journey
(b) signify brook's long journey
(c) suggest brook's final destination
(d) suggest brook's continuous journey.

(3) What poetic device does the poet use in the first line ?

(a) metaphor
(b) symbol
(c) personification
(d) simile

Answers:
1: (c) swift
2: (b) signify brook's long journey
3: (c) Personification [ A literary device by which an inanimate object is made to appear as a living creature]

Q4(CBSE 2010): Read the extract and answer the following questions.

I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance,
Among my skimming swallows;
I make the netted sunbeam dance
Against my sandy shallows.

(1) Identify the figure of speech in the first two lines :
(a) Metaphor
(b) Imagery
(c) Alliteration
(d) Simile

(2) 'the netted sunbeam dance' refer to :
(a) sunrays filtering through the intertwined leaves seem to move with the undulating movement of water
(b) rays of sun dance to the music of water creating a netted effect
(c) shadow of leaves falling on water create a dance-like effect
(d) the moving water creates the effect of dancing rays caught in the net

(3) The sandy shallows indicate that the brook is :
(a) On the last leg of her journey
(b) Drying up due to heat
(c) Filled with sediments
(d) Flowing on sandy bed

Answers:
1: (c) Alliteration [Alliteration is the repetition of speech sounds in a sequence of nearby words]
2: (b) rays of sun dance to the music of water creating a netted effect
3: (a) On the last leg of her journey
.

7 comments:

  1. Very Use But Less questions must add more

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  4. Thnx. It is a great help. But it should have more questions for practice.

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